top of page
Search

Novel Treatments for Melanoma

Updated: Jan 1

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that arises from melanocytes, which produce pigment. Normally, these cells produce dark pigments that shield the body from harmful ultraviolet rays. However, if these cells are damaged or mutated, they may begin to produce no melanin (i.e. in amelanotic melanoma), or excessive amounts of melanin, causing them to turn black or brown. While people with fair skin are more likely to develop skin cancer, people with darker skin are not immune. UV radiation (typically emitted by the sun or tanning beds) damages DNA and can cause cells to become cancerous and malignant. With the exception of a very small subset that is genetic/hereditary, managing UV exposure is critical in preventing melanoma and other skin cancers.


There are several treatment options for melanoma depending on the tumor stage, namely excision/surgical removal, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapies. Surgery is often recommended for earlier stage melanomas, while more advanced cases may require systemic therapies such as chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Radiation therapy is a tool to treat tumors that haven't spread beyond the original site. Chemotherapy drugs work by destroying rapidly dividing cells, a trait that cancerous cells tend to possess. Immunotherapy uses the host immune system to fight cancer. Targeted therapies use medications that target specific molecules involved in tumor growth.



Novel Treatments

Novel melanoma treatments are being established, including gene therapy, nanoparticles, and vaccines. The process of inserting genes into the DNA of cancer cells using viruses or synthetic particles is known as gene therapy. Nanoparticles are extremely small particles that can deliver medication directly to cancer cells. Vaccines activate the immune system, causing it to attack cancer cells.

The process of inserting genes into the DNA of cancer cells using viruses or synthetic particles is known as gene therapy. Nanoparticles are extremely small particles that can deliver medication directly to cancer cells.



40 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All
bottom of page